Posts Tagged ‘Reviews’

All is well under the sun! The events at Western Edge in Medora, at Books on Broadway in Williston, and Main Street Books in Minot prove the voracity of North Dakota readers (including visitors to the state). Thank you to the INDIE-bookstores and INDEPENDENT THINKING readers!

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Eric Hoffer Awards stormed the meaning of Listener in the Snow with its review published in US Review of Books, June 1, 2017. The legacy award states:

Unlike many in the industry, we think good books last longer than one season.”

Here is the review of Listener:

Listener in the Snow: A Novel, Tim Jollymore, Finns Way Books – In this riveting tale of the north, the author weaves unfamiliar and diverse strands to craft a surprisingly suspenseful and intriguing novel. The bitter cold of northern Minnesota, the solitary ice fisherman lodged in his darkling hut, the heritage and ambivalence of the Algonquin peoples as they mingle, often tragically, with the rest of us, the contrast of a comfortable busy life in Pensacola to a simple pure one in the forested north—these and other elements flow naturally into the story. The book is temporally layered, told retrospectively as a tale recounted in an ice house to a brother-in-law on frozen Thief Lake. It is intellectually layered as the author moves about seamlessly from simple story, to existential reflection, to gripping, totemistic Algonquin spirituality. Best of all it is a very human story as a secret past unhinges Tatty and Mary’s marriage and carries them on a journey unexpected and dreadful.

 

Listener in the Snow has won honorable mention at the prestigious Eric Hoffer Book Awards which honors small and independent presses which produce meritorious and memorable works.

The Eric Hoffer Award, http://www.hofferaward.com, honors the memory of the great American philosopher Eric Hoffer by highlighting salient writing, as well as the independent spirit of small publishers. Since its inception, the Hoffer has become one of the largest international book awards for small, academic, and independent presses.

Hoffer was an important philosopher in the ancient tradition as he was a dock worker and labor figure as well, a philosoph who never ascended much lest occupied the ivory tower. He kept both feet planted on the ground, and like Tatty in LISTENER adhered to “sisu” and to “the baking of life’s daily bread.”

 

tj

Thank God it’s over.

But wasn’t it fun.

I have to admit it was though it goes to show that political correctness and inclusivity go further than absolute merit. For an organization that has to bring forth nine contenders for Best Picture award because it keeps the audience tuned in—why not 16? Oh, college football already does that one—you can expect anything but rigorous honesty. Still, political correctness and inclusivity have a place and, for some like my brother and my girlfriend who tied for the forecaster’s prize (16/24 correct), are readable commodities. What do they tell me on the morning after?

  1. Despite the hype and promotional fortune spent pushing Gravity as a great, well-acted film, it was denied but one of the Big Six (Best picture, actor, actress, director (which it won), and supporting roles). Because of the hype and promotional fortune spent pushing Gravity as a great, well-acted film, it was granted eight “minor” awards – all earned, but who cares? Well, Gravity’s loss in Best Picture category frees me from my vow to boycott George Clooney films. And where was he last night?
  2. Best picture? 12 Years a Slave deserves the award, but the choice—over American Hustle and, especially, The Dallas Buyer’s Club—shows how P.C. and the big I work.  The voting may have easily gone to The Dallas Buyer’s Club but AIDS and sexual identity play less well (as do sexy shysters) than does the plight of Blacks in America, a condition far graver for the numbers and persistence of their difficulties. There is little argument there. So, to remain correct and open, spread the joy around: 12 Years a Slave gets Best Picture and Supporting Actress awards; The Dallas Buyer’s Club gets Best Actor—let M.McC. thank God—and Supporting Actor (a hands down favorite, earned). What about American Hustle? Go to the box office.
  3. P.C. and I., again. How can you give awards to someone whose agoraphobia and arrogance will not let him leave the Big Apple? You cannot. But how can you deny, hands down, the best performance by an actress? You cannot. Cate Blanchett had no real rivals and presented herself as the consummate actress she is.  (Applause).
  4. Now for the screen play, which Ms. Blanchett touted. No doubt Woody Allen wrote it, but am I alone to decry the so obvious, shameful, and deceitful “borrowing” from Tennessee Williams’s A Street Car Named Desire? Do so few Americans read from their literature or pay attention in high school English classes that they do not recognize this unacknowledged literary debt? Does the Academy know the difference between Original Screen Play and Adapted? This is no allusion. This is not just influence. Mr. Allen has taken, and taken liberally, without a word of credit I know of, from an original, iconic work. Now, what do we call that?  No one says a word. I hoped Ms. Blanchett at least would acknowledge her inheritance from Blanche DuBois, but nothing. Well, those who complain about the Genius of 42nd Street have to be classed with the Farrow clan, shrill detractors to the modesty and integrity of an American icon.  Please, at least, when you set San Francisco, do it, not New York. (Apple sauce).

Last word? DeGeneres: let’s have her back again.