Archive for the ‘On Books’ Category

I’m lingering in Duluth. The eclispe-that-never-happened is on no one’s mind here though the echo of the librarian’s microphoned voice has barely dissipated.

I’ve begun my revision of Twelve: lives with(out) drink, pulling back on that author-horse that wants to run away with the wagon. No galloping. (more…)

Advertisements

The response to the tour in North Dakota and the far reaches of Minnesota (Ely for instance) has been strong. That in itself is not surprising though the readers come from the four corners – New England, Florida, San Diego and Washington. More surprising is (more…)

All is well under the sun! The events at Western Edge in Medora, at Books on Broadway in Williston, and Main Street Books in Minot prove the voracity of North Dakota readers (including visitors to the state). Thank you to the INDIE-bookstores and INDEPENDENT THINKING readers!

Up next:

(more…)

Eric Hoffer Awards stormed the meaning of Listener in the Snow with its review published in US Review of Books, June 1, 2017. The legacy award states:

Unlike many in the industry, we think good books last longer than one season.”

Here is the review of Listener:

Listener in the Snow: A Novel, Tim Jollymore, Finns Way Books – In this riveting tale of the north, the author weaves unfamiliar and diverse strands to craft a surprisingly suspenseful and intriguing novel. The bitter cold of northern Minnesota, the solitary ice fisherman lodged in his darkling hut, the heritage and ambivalence of the Algonquin peoples as they mingle, often tragically, with the rest of us, the contrast of a comfortable busy life in Pensacola to a simple pure one in the forested north—these and other elements flow naturally into the story. The book is temporally layered, told retrospectively as a tale recounted in an ice house to a brother-in-law on frozen Thief Lake. It is intellectually layered as the author moves about seamlessly from simple story, to existential reflection, to gripping, totemistic Algonquin spirituality. Best of all it is a very human story as a secret past unhinges Tatty and Mary’s marriage and carries them on a journey unexpected and dreadful.

 

Listener in the Snow has won honorable mention at the prestigious Eric Hoffer Book Awards which honors small and independent presses which produce meritorious and memorable works.

The Eric Hoffer Award, http://www.hofferaward.com, honors the memory of the great American philosopher Eric Hoffer by highlighting salient writing, as well as the independent spirit of small publishers. Since its inception, the Hoffer has become one of the largest international book awards for small, academic, and independent presses.

Hoffer was an important philosopher in the ancient tradition as he was a dock worker and labor figure as well, a philosoph who never ascended much lest occupied the ivory tower. He kept both feet planted on the ground, and like Tatty in LISTENER adhered to “sisu” and to “the baking of life’s daily bread.”

 

tj